Tag Archives: Yellowstone National Park

Cherry on Top

Photo challenge: Cherry on Top:

In 2013 we went on a family trip to the Rockies. My daughter took her stuffed unicorn along, and it shows up in several pictures. I like the effect.

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Burnt Lodge Pines

Photo challenge: Look up:

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Eye Spy

Photo challenge pic.

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Yellowstone Do-Over Part 8: Messy Miscellaneous

018_edited-1This is what I get from trying to do these vacation posts by theme. I end up with leftovers–pictures that don’t fit in any theme, or I don’t have enough pictures on a topic to merit a whole themed post. Yet I feel like showing them. So this last post about our Yellowstone do-over is pretty unorganized. Hard to accept for a former librarian, but there it is. Continue reading

Yellowstone Do-Over Part 7: Some Like It Hot

508_edited-1Like I mentioned before, the central part of Yellowstone is a caldera, a piece of land that collapsed over a volcanic hotspot. Lava heats water that seeps down through cracks in the broken earth’s surface, and the steam and water find their way back to the surface in hot springs, geysers, mudpots and fumeroles. Continue reading

Yellowstone Do-Over Part 6: Skies

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Yellowstone Do-Over Part 5: Deadfall

The bottoms of concrete structures, dead trees–whatever next? Well, the bottoms of dead trees, of course. There are a lot of them in Yellowstone. Isn’t the bottom of one dead tree much like the bottom of another, you ask? Not at all; like the bottoms of bridges, each deadfall has its own personality.

Let me introduce you to…

Yellowstone Do-Over Part 4: Trees

234_edited-1Last year I had intended to do a post about the trees in Yellowstone, and the wildfires, but I didn’t have enough good pictures. As we drove out of the park on only our second morning there, on our way to the hospital in Cody, I snapped photos of burnt stretches from the RV window, but of course they didn’t work out. That’s when black and white helps. Well, I felt it did, anyway.

But you can judge for yourself.

Yellowstone Do-Over Part 3: Steaming Landscape

174_edited-1A large part of Yellowstone National Park is a caldera, land that collapsed and crumbled after volcanic activity. Water seeps through the cracks and is heated by the magma below the surface. Pressure builds and steam and water burst to the surface in geysers. Continue reading

Yellowstone Do-Over Part 2: The Wildlife

375_edited-1The wildlife was incredible. Of course there were the buffalo–or the bison, as B kept correcting us–and this time they had calves, so we kept our distance a bit more, except when we were in or near the car. Continue reading

Yellowstone Do-Over Part 1: Getting There

033_edited-1Our three-week RV trip of the Rockies and Yellowstone National Park last summer (which started here), ended sadly when B’s appendix ruptured and we spent the last four days in the Cody, Wyoming hospital instead of in Yellowstone. This summer we had one week, and lots of T’s flying miles, so we went to Yellowstone for a do-over.

Wait. What? What’s this?

Weekly Photo Challenge: Reflections

I was very tempted to use a bridge photo, but that would be a spoiler for a future post. I like this one, too, though, because it shows reflections of different things in different sections.

In Yellowstone National Park, dogs are allowed in cars and campers, but not outside except for in the campsites, on leashes. I took this picture of a small dog in a huge RV in a parking lot near a waterfall. I was wondering when I was going to use this picture. Thanks for the challenge!

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The Rockies: The Ending

Okay, I’ve put it off long enough. I’ve managed to prolong our vacation through these photo posts, but now I’ve come to the end. Not that there won’t be more photo posts about the Rockies, but they can wait. Continue reading

The Rockies: Bear? Where?

So we saw bison and elk, and two wolves at the river’s edge. They were playing and taking their time, and people were taking pictures from the other side, but just when I was finally almost close enough to start taking killer photos, they decided to leave. Aaaarrrghhh! The photos of the elk in the previous post were my photography high point of the vacation, and these wolves were my biggest photography frustration. Continue reading

The Rockies: Elk

The other animal that we saw a lot of in Yellowstone was elk. Apart from when you’re in the car, it’s not a good idea to get too close to bison, but I got pretty close to a beautiful male elk. I think I was about eight feet away at some point. That’s also not recommended; the grammatically annoying signs everywhere say that “all wildlife are dangerous”. Continue reading

The Rockies: Bison

Apart from the mud volcano and the mud pots and a few fumaroles at the beginning of our day, we mainly saw animals. So many that we never got to the next geothermal feature. And mostly we saw bison. Continue reading

The Rockies: Mud Volcanoes and Sulfur Pots

The next day we woke up to find ourselves in a wonderful campground, with lots of trees and little trails going off behind our site. Not that we spent any time there. We left after breakfast and didn’t come back until well after dark. Continue reading

The Rockies: Jackson Hole and on to Yellowstone

So the last three posts were all about one day, and it still wasn’t over. We got to Jackson Hole in the evening. You can tell by the gas station that it’s a prosperous town.

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